www.petercallesen.com
The book “Ud af Intet / Out of Nothing” about the danish comtemporary artist Peter Callesen has been published in relation to a touring solo exhibition showing Peter Callesen’s paper work in 4 different Scnadinavian art museums: The Museum of Relgious Art (Lemvig, Denmark), Trapholt Art Museum (Kolding, Denmark), Mjelby Art Museum (Halmstad, Sweden) and Haugar Vestfold Art Museum (Tønsberg, Norway)
The book includes 80 color photographs of Peter Callesen’s most important paper works and installations. The book takes us all the way from Peter Callesen’s early performances to his most recent paper works. With his subtle paper cuts that often deal with the large subjects in life, Peter Callesen’s works generate both smiles and reflection. The book includes articles written by Museum Director Gerd Rathje, Museum Manager Anni Nørskov and an interview with the artist himself. The book is a hardcover and the text is in english as well as in danish.
hardcover
121 pages

www.petercallesen.com

The book “Ud af Intet / Out of Nothing” about the danish comtemporary artist Peter Callesen has been published in relation to a touring solo exhibition showing Peter Callesen’s paper work in 4 different Scnadinavian art museums: The Museum of Relgious Art (Lemvig, Denmark), Trapholt Art Museum (Kolding, Denmark), Mjelby Art Museum (Halmstad, Sweden) and Haugar Vestfold Art Museum (Tønsberg, Norway)

The book includes 80 color photographs of Peter Callesen’s most important paper works and installations. The book takes us all the way from Peter Callesen’s early performances to his most recent paper works. With his subtle paper cuts that often deal with the large subjects in life, Peter Callesen’s works generate both smiles and reflection. The book includes articles written by Museum Director Gerd Rathje, Museum Manager Anni Nørskov and an interview with the artist himself. The book is a hardcover and the text is in english as well as in danish.

  • hardcover
  • 121 pages
"In Praise of Shadows" (陰翳礼讃 In’ei Raisan?) is an essay on Japanese aesthetics by the Japanese author and novelist Jun’ichirō Tanizaki.
The essay consists of 16 sections that discuss traditional Japanese aesthetics in contrast with change. Comparisons of light with darkness are used to contrast Western and Asian cultures. The West, in its striving for progress, is presented as continuously searching for light and clarity, while the subtle and subdued forms of oriental art and literature are seen by Tanizaki to represent an appreciation of shadow and subtlety. In places the work is strongly metaphorical. In addition to contrasting light and dark, Tanizaki further considers the layered tones of various kinds of shadows and their power to reflect low sheen materials like gold embroidery, patina and cloudy crystals. In addition, he distinguishes between the values of gleam and shine. 
The text presents personal reflections on topics as diverse as architecture and its fittings, crafts, finishes, jade, food, cosmetics and mono no aware (the art of impermanence). Tanizaki explores in close description the use of space in buildings, lacquerware by candlelight, monastery toilets and women in the dark of a brothel. The essay acts as a classic description of the collision between the shadows of traditional Japanese interiors and the dazzling light of the modern age.
paperback
96 pages

"In Praise of Shadows" (陰翳礼讃 In’ei Raisan?) is an essay on Japanese aesthetics by the Japanese author and novelist Jun’ichirō Tanizaki.

The essay consists of 16 sections that discuss traditional Japanese aesthetics in contrast with change. Comparisons of light with darkness are used to contrast Western and Asian cultures. The West, in its striving for progress, is presented as continuously searching for light and clarity, while the subtle and subdued forms of oriental art and literature are seen by Tanizaki to represent an appreciation of shadow and subtlety. In places the work is strongly metaphorical. In addition to contrasting light and dark, Tanizaki further considers the layered tones of various kinds of shadows and their power to reflect low sheen materials like gold embroidery, patina and cloudy crystals. In addition, he distinguishes between the values of gleam and shine.

The text presents personal reflections on topics as diverse as architecture and its fittings, crafts, finishes, jade, food, cosmetics and mono no aware (the art of impermanence). Tanizaki explores in close description the use of space in buildings, lacquerware by candlelight, monastery toilets and women in the dark of a brothel. The essay acts as a classic description of the collision between the shadows of traditional Japanese interiors and the dazzling light of the modern age.

  • paperback
  • 96 pages
www.sugimotohiroshi.com
Exceptional collection of Hiroshi Sugimoto´s seascape photographs.
"Water and air. So very commonplace are these substances, they hardly attract attention―and yet they vouchsafe our very existence. The beginnings of life are shrouded in myth: Let there water and air. Living phenomena spontaneously generated from water and air in the presence of light, though that could just as easily suggest random coincidence as a Deity. Let’s just say that there happened to be a planet with water and air in our solar system, and moreover at precisely the right distance from the sun for the temperatures required to coax forth life. While hardly inconceivable that at least one such planet should exist in the vast reaches of universe, we search in vain for another similar example. Mystery of mysteries, water and air are right there before us in the sea. Every time I view the sea, I feel a calming sense of security, as if visiting my ancestral home; I embark on a voyage of seeing.”
  - Hiroshi Sugimoto 
essay by Kerry Brougher
hardcover
72 pages: 30 b/w plates
32,2 x 24,6 x 1,3 cm

www.sugimotohiroshi.com

Exceptional collection of Hiroshi Sugimoto´s seascape photographs.

"Water and air. So very commonplace are these substances, they hardly attract attention―and yet they vouchsafe our very existence.

The beginnings of life are shrouded in myth: Let there water and air. Living phenomena spontaneously generated from water and air in the presence of light, though that could just as easily suggest random coincidence as a Deity. Let’s just say that there happened to be a planet with water and air in our solar system, and moreover at precisely the right distance from the sun for the temperatures required to coax forth life. While hardly inconceivable that at least one such planet should exist in the vast reaches of universe, we search in vain for another similar example.

Mystery of mysteries, water and air are right there before us in the sea. Every time I view the sea, I feel a calming sense of security, as if visiting my ancestral home; I embark on a voyage of seeing.”

  - Hiroshi Sugimoto 

  • essay by Kerry Brougher
  • hardcover
  • 72 pages: 30 b/w plates
  • 32,2 x 24,6 x 1,3 cm